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Misc.

May 2015 Meeting — WOWO’s Rob Winters!

Mr. Rob Winters, WOWO Farm Director, and host of the popular “Midwest Ag Matters” will be updating the public on the EPA’s proposed expansion of the 1972 Clean Waters Act and other farm-related issues. Whether you are a farmer or property owner, you need to be in on this conversation. Rob is a legend in Indiana farm broadcasting in great part because of his extensive knowledge of the Ag world and his connections to industry leaders.

This special presentation will be on Tuesday, May 5th at 7:00 p.m. at The Church of The Nazarene located at 506 N. Main St., Columbia City, IN and is brought to you by the Whitley County Patriots.

May 2013 Meeting — Runaway Slave

runawayslave

The next Whitley County Patriots meeting will be Tuesday, May 7th at 7:00 p.m. at The Church of The Nazarene, 506 N. Main St. Columbia City.

We will promptly begin viewing the movie, “Runaway Slave” at 7:15. Come  and watch as we travel a New Underground Railroad and discover why dependency on big government programs are destroying America for all races.

Mr. Emery McClendon, who is featured in the movie, will host this public event.  Please come and learn!

 

Voter Registration Ends October 9 — ACT NOW

Folks, it’s crunch time!  Here are a few tools to help you register to vote, and check your friends and family:

IndianaVoters.com — Many official tools here.  Check your registration, register to vote.

Wallbuilders.com — Unofficial voter registration checker…check your friends.

 

 

WCP Float to be in Three Rivers Festival Parade

This Saturday, the WCP float will be in the Fort Wayne Three Rivers Festival Parade.  Come join us!

We have several options to get there:

  • We will be meeting up at Arcola Elementary School at 7:30 AM, and carpooling to the parade marshalling area.
  • You can park at Dick Goodwin’s place of business at 2725 Rousseau (near Covington/Freeman in Fort Wayne) and ride the float to the parade.  Call Dick at 260-466-7581 if you need directions.  The float leaves at 6:30 AM.
  • If you wish to get on the parade float in the staging area, it will be near West Main and Runnion.  Parking in that area will be a challenge.  Please arrive by 8:00 AM.  The earlier you get there, the easier it will be to park.

This is the first time we have participated in the TRF Parade, so we have a few guidelines to remember:

  • Our float is honoring the military; no large political signs may be carried, but we can hand out any information we wish.
  • If we hand out candy, it must be handed out, not thrown.
  • This parade is 4.5  miles long and may take 4 hours to complete…you may want to bring a folding chair so you can sit down periodically on the float.
  • If you choose to walk, there is a set of stairs on the back of the float that should allow you to get on the float and take a break…it’s a long walk.
  • The current forecast says it might rain…keep an eye on the weather and prepare accordingly.

 

WCP Float Wins Award!

The Whitley County Patriots parade float won Non-Commercial 1st Place in the Columbia City Old Settlers’ Days Parade!

Many thanks to Dick Goodwin for creating, maintaining and driving our float!

Communism Is Not a Good Idea, Not Even on Paper

From Big Government:

When one hears someone say “communism is a great concept, a wonderful idea on paper, etc,” you know right away one is dealing with a political novice. For someone to make such a ludicrous statement in light of insurmountable evidence is either ignorant or is willing to suspend reality to entertain their own thinking, which is in essence, liberalism.

Communism runs counter to everything we know about human nature. Humans cannot reach their fulfillment while existing under arbitrary restraints. Communism is indeed a concept; a concept of shared misery. Liberals only fluff up the language and call it shared sacrifice. Either way, it brings man down to a lowly state of existence by force of a badly flawed human idea and, if removed, humans will do what comes naturally. That is produce, trade, think freely, and continuously challenge their environment where innovation and abundance comes naturally.

To say communism is a great idea on paper is like an engineer who designed a bridge except once the bridge was constructed it collapsed under its own weight. The engineer would certainly not say his design was right on paper. He would have to concede that his idea was flawed from the start, both on paper and in application.

The great flaw of communism was identified in the earliest days of the communists heyday. Back in 1920, Ludwig von Mises, argued that communism calls for the abolishment of free markets and because of this, central planners would effectively be flying blind during planning production. “Every step that takes us away from private ownership of the means of production and from the use of money also takes us away from rational economics.”

 

Despite the accolades from liberal intellectuals, there was no abundance for all to share. Under the Soviet system, millions starved to death under communism. Planning something as multifaceted as a national economy from a central committee leaves out relative value in the factors of production. There is no guideline by which to follow because there is no consumer. Without consumer control, there can be no market. Without both, there can be no way to judge urgent needs,and, ultimately, no degree of satisfaction; only constant want is left over as a product. Therefore, the concept of availability for all is scrapped in favor of shared sacrifice, which is nothing more than to say misery for all.

Communism was a failure the moment it was hatched. It became a great misery for those forced under its sphere the moment it was put into practice.

What Do You Mean They Kept My Money?!?

From Ricochet:

I had another invaluable experience in a on-going education of my daughter against the unfairness of big government.   We were parking at an old fashioned coin meter and I asked her to put the quarters in.  My daughter didn’t realize there was a forty minute time limit on the machine.  That’s two quarters. She put in three. I told her of her mistake and she instantly started looking for a coin return. I told her there isn’t one.  She was positively outraged.  Yup, I said, that’s the difference between private enterprise and the government.  You put in an extra quarter in the Coke machine, you are supposed to get it back.  Give a quarter to the government and you will never see it again.

The Law: What Is Liberty?

From Big Government:

From The Law, by Frederic Bastiat:

Actually, what is the political struggle that we witness? It is the instinctive struggle of all people toward liberty. And what is this liberty, whose very name makes the heart beat faster and shakes the world? Is it not the union of all liberties — liberty of conscience, of education, of association, of the press, of travel, of labor, of trade? In short, is not liberty the freedom of every person to make full use of his faculties, so long as he does not harm other persons while doing so? Is not liberty the destruction of all despotism — including, of course, legal despotism? Finally, is not liberty the restricting of the law only to its rational sphere of organizing the right of the individual to lawful self- defense; of punishing injustice?

It must be admitted that the tendency of the human race toward liberty is largely thwarted, especially in France. This is greatly due to a fatal desire — learned from the teachings of antiquity — that our writers on public affairs have in common: They desire to set themselves above mankind in order to arrange, organize, and regulate it according to their fancy.

Philanthropic Tyranny

While society is struggling toward liberty, these famous men who put themselves at its head are filled with the spirit of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. They think only of subjecting mankind to the philanthropic tyranny of their own social inventions. Like Rousseau, they desire to force mankind docilely to bear this yoke of the public welfare that they have dreamed up in their own imaginations.

This was especially true in 1789. No sooner was the old regime destroyed than society was subjected to still other artificial arrangements, always starting from the same point: the omnipotence of the law.

Listen to the ideas of a few of the writers and politicians during that period:

SAINT-JUST: “The legislator commands the future. It is for him to will the good of mankind. It is for him to make men what he wills them to be.”

ROBESPIERRE: “The function of government is to direct the physical and moral powers of the nation toward the end for which the commonwealth has come into being.”

BILLAUD-VARENNES: “A people who are to be returned to liberty must be formed anew. A strong force and vigorous action are necessary to destroy old prejudices, to change old customs, to correct depraved affections, to restrict superfluous wants, and to destroy ingrained vices…. Citizens, the inexible austerity of Lycurgus created the firm foundation of the Spartan republic. The weak and trusting character of Solon plunged Athens into slavery. This parallel embraces the whole science of government.”

LE PELLETIER: “Considering the extent of human degradation, I am convinced that it is necessary to effect a total regeneration and, if I may so express myself, of creating a new people.”

The Socialists Want Dictatorship

Again, it is claimed that persons are nothing but raw material. It is not for them to will their own improvement; they are incapable of it. According to Saint- Just, only the legislator is capable of doing this. Persons are merely to be what the legislator wills them to be. According to Robespierre, who copies Rousseau literally, the legislator begins by decreeing the end for which the commonwealth has come into being. Once this is determined, the government has only to direct the physical and moral forces of the nation toward that end. Meanwhile, the inhabitants of the nation are to remain completely passive. And according to the teachings of Billaud- Varennes, the people should have no prejudices, no affections, and no desires except those authorized by the legislator. He even goes so far as to say that the inflexible austerity of one man is the foundation of a republic.

In cases where the alleged evil is so great that ordinary governmental procedures cannot cure it, Mably recommends a dictatorship to promote virtue: “Resort,” he says, “to an extraordinary tribunal with considerable powers for a short time. The imagination of the citizens needs to be struck a hard blow.” This doctrine has not been forgotten. Listen to Robespierre:

“The principle of the republican government is virtue, and the means required to establish virtue is terror. In our country we desire to substitute morality for selfishness, honesty for honor, principles for customs, duties for manners, the empire of reason for the tyranny of fashion, contempt of vice for contempt of poverty, pride for insolence, greatness of soul for vanity, love of glory for love of money, good people for good companions, merit for intrigue, genius for wit, truth for glitter, the charm of happiness for the boredom of pleasure, the greatness of man for the littleness of the great, a generous, strong, happy people for a good-natured, frivolous, degraded people; in short, we desire to substitute all the virtues and miracles of a republic for all the vices and absurdities of a monarchy.”

Dictatorial Arrogance

At what a tremendous height above the rest of mankind does Robespierre here place himself! And note the arrogance with which he speaks. He is not content to pray for a great reawakening of the human spirit. Nor does he expect such a result from a well-ordered government. No, he himself will remake mankind, and by means of terror.

This mass of rotten and contradictory statements is extracted from a discourse by Robespierre in which he aims to explain the principles of morality which ought to guide a revolutionary government. Note that Robespierre’s request for dictatorship is not made merely for the purpose of repelling a foreign invasion or putting down the opposing groups. Rather he wants a dictatorship in order that he may use terror to force upon the country his own principles of morality. He says that this act is only to be a temporary measure preceding a new constitution. But in reality, he desires nothing short of using terror to extinguish from France selfishness, honor, customs, manners, fashion, vanity, love of money, good companionship, intrigue, wit, sensuousness, and poverty. Not until he, Robespierre, shall have accomplished these miracles, as he so rightly calls them, will he permit the law to reign again.

 

The Law: The Socialists

From Big Government:

From The Law, by Frederic Bastiat:


How did politicians ever come to believe this weird idea that the law could be made to produce what it does not contain — the wealth, science, and religion that, in a positive sense, constitute prosperity? Is it due to the influence of our modern writers on public affairs?

Present-day writers — especially those of the socialist school of thought — base their various theories upon one common hypothesis: They divide mankind into two parts. People in general — with the exception of the writer himself — from the first group. The writer, all alone, forms the second and most important group. Surely this is the weirdest and most conceited notion that ever entered a human brain!

In fact, these writers on public affairs begin by supposing that people have within themselves no means of discernment; no motivation to action. The writers assume that people are inert matter, passive particles, motionless atoms, at best a kind of vegetation indifferent to its own manner of existence. They assume that people are susceptible to being shaped — by the will and hand of another person — into an infinite variety of forms, more or less symmetrical, artistic, and perfected.

Moreover, not one of these writers on governmental affairs hesitates to imagine that he himself — under the title of organizer, discoverer, legislator, or founder — is this will and hand, this universal motivating force, this creative power whose sublime mission is to mold these scattered materials — persons — into a society.

These socialist writers look upon people in the same manner that the gardener views his trees. Just as the gardener capriciously shapes the trees into pyramids, parasols, cubes, vases, fans, and other forms, just so does the socialist writer whimsically shape human beings into groups, series, centers, sub-centers, honeycombs, labor corps, and other variations. And just as the gardener needs axes, pruning hooks, saws, and shears to shape his trees, just so does the socialist writer need the force that he can find only in law to shape human beings. For this purpose, he devises tariff laws, tax laws, relief laws, and school laws.

The Socialists Wish to Play God

Socialists look upon people as raw material to be formed into social combinations. This is so true that, if by chance, the socialists have any doubts about the success of these combinations, they will demand that a small portion of mankind be set aside to experiment upon. The popular idea of trying all systems is well known. And one socialist leader has been known seriously to demand that the Constituent Assembly give him a small district with all its inhabitants, to try his experiments upon.

In the same manner, an inventor makes a model before he constructs the full-sized machine; the chemist wastes some chemicals — the farmer wastes some seeds and land — to try out an idea.

But what a difference there is between the gardener and his trees, between the inventor and his machine, between the chemist and his elements, between the farmer and his seeds! And in all sincerity, the socialist thinks that there is the same difference between him and mankind!

It is no wonder that the writers of the nineteenth century look upon society as an artificial creation of the legislator’s genius. This idea — the fruit of classical education — has taken possession of all the intellectuals and famous writers of our country. To these intellectuals and writers, the relationship between persons and the legislator appears to be the same as the relationship between the clay and the potter.

Moreover, even where they have consented to recognize a principle of action in the heart of man — and a principle of discernment in man’s intellect — they have considered these gifts from God to be fatal gifts. They have thought that persons, under the impulse of these two gifts, would fatally tend to ruin themselves. They assume that if the legislators left persons free to follow their own inclinations, they would arrive at atheism instead of religion, ignorance instead of knowledge, poverty instead of production and exchange.

The Socialists Despise Mankind

According to these writers, it is indeed fortunate that Heaven has bestowed upon certain men — governors and legislators — the exact opposite inclinations, not only for their own sake but also for the sake of the rest of the world! While mankind tends toward evil, the legislators yearn for good; while mankind advances toward darkness, the legislators aspire for enlightenment; while mankind is drawn toward vice, the legislators are attracted toward virtue. Since they have decided that this is the true state of affairs, they then demand the use of force in order to substitute their own inclinations for those of the human race.

Open at random any book on philosophy, politics, or history, and you will probably see how deeply rooted in our country is this idea — the child of classical studies, the mother of socialism. In all of them, you will probably find this idea that mankind is merely inert matter, receiving life, organization, morality, and prosperity from the power of the state. And even worse, it will be stated that mankind tends toward degeneration, and is stopped from this downward course only by the mysterious hand of the legislator. Conventional classical thought everywhere says that behind passive society there is a concealed power called law or legislator (or called by some other terminology that designates some unnamed person or persons of undisputed influence and authority) which moves, controls, benefits, and improves mankind.

American Soldiers Forced to Wear Hijabs

From Moonbattery:

To judge by this picture, our various wars in the Middle East are not going well:

From the Daily Caller:

American female soldiers stationed in Afghanistan are being encouraged to wear a Muslim headscarf when interacting with civilians. But some question whether the practice constitutes cultural sensitivity or a form of appeasement that is degrading to U.S. soldiers.

What does “encouraged” mean in this context? It means commanded.

Major Kyndra Rotunda, executive director of the Military Law and Policy Institute and AMVETS Legal Clinic, told The Daily Caller that while the women are not being ordered to wear the head scarf, encouragement is tantamount to a demand.

This sort of foolishness has been imposed before:

Retired Col. Martha McSally, whose grievance about being forced to wear the Muslim abaya while stationed in Saudi Arabia in the 1990s resulted in 2002 legislation outlawing the practice of making female soldiers wear Muslim religious garb in Saudi Arabia, told The Daily Caller that the sanctity of the uniform should not be sullied with outside accessories like the hijab.

“Another thing that makes this inappropriate is that they are wearing it with their uniform,” she said. “All the services have several-hundred-page regulations about what is appropriate and is not appropriate to wear with the uniform, and we have very strict guidelines … You are representing the United States government. You are wearing the U.S. military uniform, and it confuses what you are representing when you add this to the uniform.”

Not to mention that hijabs obstruct peripheral vision and are somewhat less effective at stopping bullets and shrapnel than Kevlar helmets. But for the politicians running the military, the important thing is to obsequiously pander to Islamic practices, even those that represent the subjugation of women.

Get used to the look. If we don’t start taking our own side in this fight, it will be catching on closer to home.

God Bless America

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